Jobs, not Pity for Veterans

MrTpity.jpgThe veteran returning from war and suffering from PTSD is a frequent theme in pop culture and the media. You might easily be fooled into thinking this was the case for all veterans. But the vast majority of veterans do not suffer from PTSD and are ready to apply their dedication, loyalty, commitment, and work ethic into being highly productive members of society.

In a recent article in the Washington Post, Howard Schultz and Rajiv Chandrasekaran contrast today's society where less than 1% of Americans are post 9/11 veterans with the post WWII time when everyone knew not just one, but many veterans returning from the war. Because of this, people were more aware that veterans were normal people and even those suffering from PTSD had much to contribute to society.

From Howard Schultz and Rajiv Chandrasekaran, Want to help veterans? Stop pitying them.

The press, politicians and even many veterans’ advocacy groups tend to focus, with legitimate reason, on service members who have returned banged up or who are struggling in their new civilian lives. But this fails to convey the full measure of this generation of veterans. That wouldn’t be a problem if Americans knew their military and understood these stories in context, with the knowledge of veterans who are thriving. But fewer than 1 percent of Americans have participated in our latest wars. Add their direct family members, and it is still only about 5 percent of the population.

With so few possessing a direct link to someone who has served, Americans often don’t understand that most of our veterans are not damaged and that many have successfully navigated the transition to life after the military. Even those suffering from trauma or physical injuries can have an enormously positive impact in their communities. Our veterans can make — and are making — valuable contributions in business, government, education, health and community service.

Our all-volunteer force has provided us with the best-trained military in the world. The reliance on volunteers, however, has led many other Americans to pay scant attention to the sacrifice and skill of our warriors. We let them protect us, while we go on with life as usual.

After World War II, even if your veteran neighbor wandered the street at night, agitated with shell shock, you knew that other veterans were going to be just fine. You knew this because you knew them — because your father, sons and brothers had served.

Schultz and Chandrasekaran then share stories of veterans rejected from volunteer work and facing job discrimination because of these misconceptions.

What, then, should a veteran looking for a civilian job do? There are many job boards catering to veterans, but a close examination will show that many have just started in the last few years. Additionally, the jobs on many such boards are simply repostings of jobs on non-veteran web sites such as Monster or Indeed.

MilitaryHire is different. In business since 1999, we are run by veterans for veterans. Each and every job posted on our site comes from a company that does business directly with us because they want to hire veterans. These are companies that recognize the value a veteran brings to a company.

To find a job with one of these companies, first register with MilitaryHire. Then post your resume. Finally, set up several Job Scouts by searching for jobs and saving the search as a scout. Job Scouts will notify you by email each day when a new job meeting your search criteria is posted.

Once you've done that, follow us on Facebook and LinkedIn where we will be highlighting particular employers and jobs. Join the conversation and let us know what we can do to better serve you!

MilitaryHire has jobs for veterans

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  1. Sign Up. You’ve served your country. Now let us serve you. Sign up now—it’s free, quick, and easy.
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  3. Search Jobs. Don’t wait for companies to find you. Set up automated Job Scouts to scour our database and notify you of new jobs.
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